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Now that Saudi Arabia has allowed women to drive just as cars are becoming A.I. driverless (Nelson Muntz, "Ha Ha"), its time to put Movim into a carputer. One of the uses for this is to have the XMPP video conferencing streaming your dashcam footage to your home (or other remote location), probably to be captured in a stream to a remote home-computer maybe via FOSS software similar to OBS or miracast (even though the local carputer might be set up to be a video-recording 'blackbox' in the car itself too).

Carputer

It basically doesn't matter if Movim video-conferencing only does a video-call via just two computers linked in peer-to-peer at the moment. The carputer could have several cameras "mixed" into say 4 way split screen (like diddykong-racing or goldeneye 4-player on the N64 resembles). The 4 cameras could point out the windows in a Front, Back, Left and Right configuration (or something similar).

Of course, Movim in an HTPC could also have similar functionality. To build the carputer, it would be perfectly possible to choose either a MITX mainboard or to gut-out a laptop. The processing should be fine, as long as a computer is capable of playing Blu-Ray (usually dual-core 1.6Ghz with zacate or AMD graphics APU is fine, but double it to a rasperry-pi3bplus quad core of a 3GHz dual-core to be on the safe side and a little virtualisation ability might help, and future 3D collada support could capture physics from cameras acting as stereoscopic). Having opengl4.4 is nice but if you need opencl, something like a a6-6400k APU gives opencl 1.2 but an AMD 7400k gives opencl2.0 on the apu. Power efficient equivalents would need to be considered as alternatives. A 12volt car stereo can be powered from a modified xbox360 psu at home, if you want an htpc to match the carputer.

Fitting the carputer into a car-stereo bay so a DVDRW is included would be tidy and it also means, if a network fails, you could burn two 1GB DVD-R 8cm discs and pop them in a standard-letter-size (110 x 220 mm) envelope with a first class stamp to friends or family at a nearby postbox, so that within a day or three, at least some footage can get to them (and maybe have a folded Return Address SAE inside the envelope too). Or have the computer installed somewhere in the car it won't get stolen, and the DVDRW drive could simply be connected by a long cable to the car-stero bay. If the carputer is running Kodi many touchscreen options exist and so can voice-activation.

There is a myth that women drivers are safer drivers. The truth is, men drive more. The self-heating tin of all-day-breakfast exists because of men drivers. Necessity is the mother of invention, and hunger is the brother of indigestion. It is part of men in careers involving driving, as business not just residential. The majority of accidents happen 2 minutes from home. The flooding of women onto the roads as drivers is really just a quantitative easing, creating a hyperinflation of drivers. It is a way to launder funny money. Like alcohol-prohibition era America, more rules paves the way for more corruption. All roads lead to Rome, and when in Rome, the fall of Rome is by driving drunk on girl-powah. That'll put lead in your pencil. When women hold up half the sky, they take up your braking-distance. Women destroyed the environment in creating more roads by exceeding the capacity of those roads already existing. Carpooling spreads diseases. Arguing against it gets car companies and insurers calling you a male chauffeurnist. So with the abundance of falsehoods pre-emptively trying to find men autoguilty, don't get caught out by the social-distancing cameras that only put A.I. red-boxes around the chosen few, and don't get caught out by the establishment's electronic-line-judge or their equivalents to "HawkEye Cyclops" where corruption in sport is in court, found to be rigged. Driving is a sport, and could we be surprised if they'd employ their same tactics there on the main road? Speed cameras have been questioned in the past. Create your own data and have your own specialists, friends and back-ups at hand.

Movim RSS could keep you abreast of new changes on a road before the mainstream media or traffic reports get the information.

An automatic message over the XMPP chatroom or conferencing could send a message and a hash file of the video file you make such as a magnet link to a torrent. When the airbag goes off, a torrent is seeded, and an (atom) RSS published. War-driving with your IPFS could also be used, and could be a mobile Movim Pod. With that, finding driving routes via a route-finder can be done in a way that finds today's best war-driving route if the journey is tweaked, so maybe even coverage is mapped when microwave or other wireless comms are affected by weather or impaired communications masts.

And if all else fails, make your carputer's A.I. brain one of them #MGTOW wuvbots and you can just call anybody who disagrees with you sexist. If she crashes, she is the primary victim of wardriving for she is the one left behind.

  • Carputer

    A carputer is a computer with specializations to run in a car, such as compact size, low power requirement, and some customized components. The actual computing hardware is typically based on standard PCs or mobile devices. Because they are computer based they typically have many standard interfaces such as Bluetooth, USB, and WiFi. The first carputer was introduced by Clarion Co. on December 4, 1998, although on-board diagnostics have already been employed ever since the 1980s in order to measure precisely the amount of fuel entering the engine as the carburetors got too complex.A challenge to installing a computer in a car is the power supply. Energy is supplied as a nominal 12V DC in cars or 24V in some trucks. The real voltage varies according to whether the engine is on or off since the battery generally delivers less than 12V, while the generator supplies more. There can be peaks, and at ignition time the current supply drops. External DC/DC converters can help to regulate voltages so these can be used.Police cars often have Mobile data terminals in the form of a laptop swivel mounted where the driver's armrest would be. This can be used to log data...

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A video (see the mpeg4 file or the youtube video embedded) by Styxhexenhammer666 (aka Styx) reports that the video website known as VidMe is shutting down. He makes some good points about echo chambers. Here is my two cents: The eagerness for VidMe to succeed seemed to be the domain of its userbase. The VidMe website itself did not seem to value that strength. It's heavy handed "one strike" policy was over the top in comparison to youtube's "two week ban" approach. Letting a user know in advance so they get a chance to undo whatever it is that has offended the website creators is much more fair. Alas, perhaps for VidMe, the ego would rather destroy itself than turn to face its own shadows. In the youtube comments sections of Styx's videos, some people who used youtube and VidMe reported that people would get "instabanned" for posting a link. They spoke of #censorship too. It was as if automatically they were deemed a spammer and therefore instantly banned.

Not only is this not "fair" (in terms of giving a person a chance to hear them out) but also it seems absurd that hyperlinks on the internet (and sure, we are not talking adult boobs or anything) are what make content and are also citations. It seemed to be hypocritical seeing as the actual videos from VidMe where often hyperlinks for direct ripping from youtube. So far Movim seems to embrace the fact that a link can be embedded as the basis for a post made. Of course, even with the two week timeout banning by youtube, youtube would likely be seen as more fair if youtube were to actually tell an account owner if they have been shadowbanned in comments. Another poor thing VidMe did which came across as hypocritical was the way it would allow a person to rip youtube videos on its own website but then would not allow the ability to rip videos from its own website to another person's website. It gave off the impression of it being a one way street. It raised questions about the way that, in doing so, vidme did not seem to acknowledge youtube had made deals with the Performing Rights Society for copyright music uploaded. Sure there are sometimes nuances, however, you either respect the function of ripping, or you don't. That applies to those who feel copyright laws are working and to those who feel copyright laws are not working.

Not only this but VidMe had a habit of engineering fame for those who got the front page a lot. Some channels, displeased with what they felt was unfair treatment closed their channels, such as the GoMGTOW channel and that channel had helped give shoutouts to other VidMe channels. Even metacafe allowed their upload button again recently and metajolt is a website that allows direct mpeg4 file links. The vlogger StyxHexenHammer666 (or often aka "Styx" for short) reports that VidMe is shutting down its servers. Styx then shows another site is available, known as 'Pew.Tube' and it has been allowing direct mpeg4 links to the videos on its pages. So the source video webpage for Styx's video is here but, the actual mpeg4 file can also be linked. He does also have a BitChute webpage. The way VidMe allowed embedding of videos was limited for some other websites including the way in which Movim handles HTML. Do remember that Movim has some pretty good features for HTML albeit oldschool (a bit like HTML4) but in a good way. A Direct mpeg4 link can help. Those also work on that vidlii website. Mind you TopBuzz is a website that does not seem to have it.

While Styx has not mentioned them, see also planktos github or zeronet wikipedia or InterPlanetaryFileSystem for other webtorrent or crypto-currency social networks. Styx also has his video on youtube. Styx references an archive webpage to demonstrate the news. Do consider using the #prepTorrent Filenaming convention too. Thank you to Jim Giant and Go MGTOW ( #JimGiant and #GoMGTOW ) and others for their kindness during my one strike instaban. #prepTorrentFilenamingConvention